Attention and Executive Functioning for Self-Regulated Learning

Attention and executive functioning are inter-related cognitive functions that are foundational to self-regulated learning. These cognitive functions, and our support of these in the classroom, relate more to ‘how we learn’ rather than what we learn. While we might not always teach these skills explicitly as curriculum content, they are a critical element of our teaching style, and the supports and strategies that we provide to our students. 

This presentation introduces educators to the science of attention and executive functioning. Educators are guided in exploring how they currently utilize implicit knowledge of these cognitive functions to facilitate self-regulation in the education context.

Aisling Mulvihill

Aisling Mulvihill is a practicing speech pathologist, clinical educator and researcher at the University of Queensland. Her research activities span the topic of self-regulation from early childhood to adolescence.

In 2006, Aisling completed a Bachelor of Science in Clinical Speech and Language Studies in Trinity College, Dublin. She has worked as a paediatric Speech Pathologist in both Ireland and Australia across sectors of public health, education, and private practice. Aisling has specialised practice in supporting children with learning and social-emotional challenges relating to Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD) and Specific Language Impairment (SLI).

In 2013, Aisling co-authored the Ant Patrol Children’s Stories, a series of six educational children’s stories that aim to support children’s social and emotional learning. The series has been well-received by educators, allied health professionals and parents.

Aisling’s PhD research investigates the development of self-talk as a self-regulatory tool in children with and without developmental vulnerability. Aisling is also involved in a large-scale interdisciplinary science of learning research project investigating the effect of metacognitive training on attention control in young adolescents.