Colloquia

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Policy and assessment in lower secondary school music education. Don't do what the English have.

Date: Wednesday, 17 Jul 2017
Time: 5.30-7 pm
Venue: studioFive, Level 5, Kwong Lee Dow Building 234 Queensberry Street, The University of Melbourne

This presentation will discuss England’s shifting policy for secondary school music education by exploring the policy background to these changes, viewed through the particular lens of assessment.

England’s system of enacting and policing policy changes has led schools to feel that education policy focus has moved away from attainment, and onto progress. By concentrating on progress England’s Office for Standards in Education (Ofsted) are signalling that they are concerned with the speed at which attainment takes place, rather than just noting that it has taken place.

Presenter Professor Martin Fautley will cover the role of policy makers, and discuss where policy-making rests in England, with the legislature, or with Ofsted – the judiciary and police rolled into one. He will also explain why he recommends that international music education does not follow the lead that England has taken in this regard!

Professor Martin Fautley is director of research in the school of education and social work at Birmingham City University. He has a wealth of experience in music education, both in terms of pedagogy, and of music education research. After enjoying many years as a classroom music teacher, he then undertook full-time Doctoral research working across the education and music faculties at Cambridge University, investigating teaching, learning, and assessment of classroom music making, with a focus on composing as a classroom activity.

He is widely known for his work on researching assessment in the classroom, but also researches understandings of musical learning and progression (especially in the novice stages), composing, and creativity. He regularly undertakes research and evaluation projects in the field of music education.

Professor Fautley is the author of eight books, including “Assessment in Music Education”, published by Oxford University Press. He has written and published over fifty journal articles, book chapters, and academic research papers on a range of aspects of teaching and learning, and regularly presents the fruits of his researches at international conferences. He is co-editor of the British Journal of Music Education.

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Developing a framework for music education and defining quality

Date: Tuesday 11 Apr 2016
Time: 5.30-7 pm
Venue: studioFive, Level 5, Kwong Lee Dow Building 234 Queensberry Street, The University of Melbourne

Julia Morris is the Visual Arts Education (Secondary) Course Coordinator at Edith Cowan University Western Australia, where she lectures in visual arts curriculum and education. She researches within the Edith Cowan Institute for Education Research, with key research interests including student engagement, art history, and teacher education, specifically teachers’ self-efficacy and identity. Julia also promotes ongoing opportunities for teachers to sustain in the Arts, co-leading a large-scale artist-inresidence programme with Curtin University and leading the WA cohort of TAP with MGSE.

Abstract

STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) education has been a highly politicised agenda over the past decade. During this time STEM has been promoted as an authentic and engaging approach to education, particularly as Australia tries to boost its performance in international testing. However, STEM has recently been challenged by STEAM, where ‘art and design’ represent the ‘A’. STEAM advocates for creativity and expression to be included in STEM education so that students can develop critical and creative thinking, skills to prepare them for the global economy. In the past two years, the Edith Cowan Institute for Education Research (ECIER) has researched how the STEAM acronym is defined and applied by teachers. In addition, ECIER sought to apply STEAM education to a regional Western Australian school, where opportunities for the artistic expression and artsbased learning in STEAM gave non-mainstream students a chance to be included in learning with gifted and talented education students. In this presentation the regional school project is used as a case study to identify opportunities and challenges for STEAM education.

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The STEAM Agenda: Using the Arts to Create Opportunities for Learning

Date: Wednesday 14 Sep 2016
Time: 5.30-7 pm
Venue: studioFive, Level 5, 234 Queensberry Street, The University of Melbourne

Neryl JEANNERET, Ph.D., is Associate Professor and Head of Music Education at MGSE. She has held leadership positions in music education, including President of the Australian Society for Music Education and Chair of the International Society for Music Education’s Policy Commission. She has served as an advisor to curriculum and education authorities in NSW and Victoria and publications include book chapters, journal articles, and materials for the Australian Music Centre, Musica Viva, Opera Australia, the Sydney Symphony Orchestra, Arts Victoria and State education authorities. Her recent research focuses on informal pedagogy in the music classroom, engaging practice and outcomes in a number of contexts including museums, and models of creative practitioners working with young people.

Abstract

The 2013 Victorian Parliament’s Inquiry into the extent, benefits and potential of music education in Victorian schools resulted in a number of recommendations by the government to be implemented by the Department of Education and Training (DET). This implementation has been monitored by the Music Education Expert Reference Group (MEERG), a group of stakeholders representing schools, teachers, professional associations, universities and the music industry. After continuing discussion with this group, the DET decided that a quality music education framework was needed to support the realisation of the full potential of the Inquiry’s recommendations in Victorian government primary and secondary schools. In August 2015, the Melbourne Graduate School of Education was engaged to develop a F-12 Quality Music Education Framework. The challenge was to pull together research, policy, and stakeholder interests into a single framework that defined “quality music education” for Victorian schools and covered a spectrum of schools (and teachers) with little or no music education in place to those with well-established and flourishing music programs. Defining “quality music education” in a way that also provides a framework for accountability is a complicated exercise. Policy documents relating to classroom music have to be necessarily broad to accommodate the needs and contexts of students across a broad range of demographic, cultural and geographical backgrounds. This need for flexibility must be balanced with a specificity that is actually useful for teachers in guiding their practice in a wide range of music education contexts. This presentation discusses these issues by recounting the work done to develop this quality framework for music education in schools in Victoria. Drawing from a meta-synthesis of the music education research and policy literature, the two models offered for discussion to the Department of Education and Training, Victoria and the outcomes are discussed.

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Developing a framework for music education & defining quality

Date: Wednesday 14 Sep 2016
Time: 5.30-7 pm
Venue: studioFive, Level 5, 234 Queensberry Street, The University of Melbourne

Neryl JEANNERET, Ph.D., is Associate Professor and Head of Music Education at MGSE. She has held leadership positions in music education, including President of the Australian Society for Music Education and Chair of the International Society for Music Education’s Policy Commission. She has served as an advisor to curriculum and education authorities in NSW and Victoria and publications include book chapters, journal articles, and materials for the Australian Music Centre, Musica Viva, Opera Australia, the Sydney Symphony Orchestra, Arts Victoria and State education authorities. Her recent research focuses on informal pedagogy in the music classroom, engaging practice and outcomes in a number of contexts including museums, and models of creative practitioners working with young people.

Abstract

The 2013 Victorian Parliament’s Inquiry into the extent, benefits and potential of music education in Victorian schools resulted in a number of recommendations by the government to be implemented by the Department of Education and Training (DET). This implementation has been monitored by the Music Education Expert Reference Group (MEERG), a group of stakeholders representing schools, teachers, professional associations, universities and the music industry. After continuing discussion with this group, the DET decided that a quality music education framework was needed to support the realisation of the full potential of the Inquiry’s recommendations in Victorian government primary and secondary schools. In August 2015, the Melbourne Graduate School of Education was engaged to develop a F-12 Quality Music Education Framework. The challenge was to pull together research, policy, and stakeholder interests into a single framework that defined “quality music education” for Victorian schools and covered a spectrum of schools (and teachers) with little or no music education in place to those with well-established and flourishing music programs. Defining “quality music education” in a way that also provides a framework for accountability is a complicated exercise. Policy documents relating to classroom music have to be necessarily broad to accommodate the needs and contexts of students across a broad range of demographic, cultural and geographical backgrounds. This need for flexibility must be balanced with a specificity that is actually useful for teachers in guiding their practice in a wide range of music education contexts. This presentation discusses these issues by recounting the work done to develop this quality framework for music education in schools in Victoria. Drawing from a meta-synthesis of the music education research and policy literature, the two models offered for discussion to the Department of Education and Training, Victoria and the outcomes are discussed.

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Heavier than Air: Experiences of LGBTQ teachers represented through performance

Date: Wednesday 25 May 2016
Time: 5.30-7 pm
Venue: Drama Theatre, Level 5, 234 Queensberry Street, The University of Melbourne

This colloquium introduces an important new work to the education community. Presenters Anne Harris, Rachel Forgasz, and Stacy Holman Jones, from Monash University read selected scenes from the play, Heavier than Air. Drawing on interviews with 14 LGBTQ teachers in Victoria, the play charts the experiences of gay, lesbian, and transgender teachers and has sparked a call for the research to be extended further into a national study.

The play was performed in Adelaide in November 2015 and is featured in a forthcoming text, Writing for Performance (Harris and Holman Jones, Sense Publishers). The reading of scenes from the play will be followed by a panel discussion bringing together the Monash University presenters with colleagues from MGSE to consider the implications of this work for the teacher education community – as education practitioners and researchers.

This event is held in celebration of the UNESCO International Arts Education Week, and the opening of the Graduate School‘s new studioFive Arts Education space.

The play

Pannel Discussion

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The relationship between the arts, education and social justice activism

Date: Wednesday 06 Apr 2016
Time: 5.30-7 pm
Venue: Frank Tate Room, Level 9, 100 Leicester Street, The University of Melbourne

Abstract

Felicity’s presentation will construct one attempt at articulating the relationship, both in theory and practice, between the arts, education and social justice activism. The place of imagination and creativity is particularly important in a climate where programming for schooling is constrictive and reductive. Art teaches many things – line, colour, form and elements and principles that the artist uses to make forms. But it also teaches - even very young children - that you are a subject in the world, and that you can have an effect on others, across time and place.

Felicity McArdle is Associate Professor at Charles Sturt University (CSU), NSW and Adjunct A/Professor at Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Brisbane. Before an academic career, she taught for over 14 years, in urban, rural, and remote districts, in before school settings, and in Primary schools. Felicity has a long-standing interest in the arts and arts education, particularly what art ‘does’, and why access to the arts is important for all. She was an invited member of the consortium, led by Prof Sumsion and Prof Harrison, that wrote the first national framework for the early years in Australia, the Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF). Felicity was a senior member of the Excellence in Research Early Years Education Collaborative Research Network, a three-year research capacity building program funded by the Australian Government Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education. She was co-leader within the CRN of Program 3: Social Justice, Access, Inclusion and Policy. Felicity is currently working with a team of investigators, on a Discovery Project funded by the Australian Research Council, which is an inquiry into the state of “play” in the early years curriculum.

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Dr Richard Sallis (editor of the policy document and writer of the sexualities policy) lectures in drama/theatre in the Melbourne Graduate School of Education (MGSE) at The University of Melbourne. He has a background in the performing arts and Theatre for Young People (TYP). Richard is a former President of Drama Australia and the current Director of Publications for IDEA (International Drama/Theatre and Education Association). His research interests include arts education, gender and sexualities and education and methods associated with ethnography and performed research.

Dr Jo Raphael (writer of the disability section of the policy) is lecturer in drama education in the School of Education at Deakin University. She is artistic director of Fusion Theatre, an inclusive theatre company with two ensembles made up of actors with and without disability, who work alongside professional artists and directors to make original theatre. Jo's PhD study, The Disruptive Aesthetic Space (2013), focused on drama as a transformative pedagogy for challenging pre-service teachers into new ways of thinking about students with disability.

Dr Carol Carter (writer of the cultural and linguistic diversity section of the policy) is currently Higher Education Lecturer in Early Childhood Education at Holmesglen Institute. Her research interests include drama education and issues relating to cultural identity and cultural and linguistic diversity. Some of her most recent work involves examining ways in which the arts support cultural identities in early childhood contexts, the role of drama in affirming and supporting diversity and exploring strategies and techniques to support learning and teaching in diverse higher education contexts.

Ms Meg Upton is currently the Director of Projects for Drama Australia She lectures in Drama Education, in the M.Ed and is a Student Academic Mentor in the Teach for Australia Program at Deakin University. Meg's industry consultation work includes MTC, Malthouse, Ilbijerri, Victorian Opera, Arena Theatre, KAGE, Arts Centre Melbourne and Bell Shakespeare. She will be submitting her PhD this year, a study that investigates the pedagogies of teaching performance analysis in the VCE. Recent publications include "Education and the Arts: Creativity in the promised new order" for Currency House (2014), and "The Provocative Space. Deepening Students' Experience of Live Theatre Performance" International Yearbook for Research in Arts Education (2015).

Dr Christine Hatton, University of Newcastle, NSW (Gender policy writer) and Dr Kelly Freebody, University of Sydney (SES policy writer) will be assisting in the development of this Colloquium.

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Making Visual Arts Learning Visible in A Generalist Primary School Classroom

Date: Wednesday 16 Sept 2015
Time: 5.30-7 pm
Venue: Frank Tate Room, Level 9, 100 Leicester Street, The University of Melbourne
RSVP: Andria Karageorgopoulos andriak@unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

This colloquium presents the story of one generalist primary school teacher's shift in art praxis through her involvement in a CASS funded research project focused on a continuous, recursive process within a teacher-facilitator-interviewer triad. Mixed-methods were adopted with an emphasis on ethnographic-style 'evocative narratives'. Social-constructivism informed the Professional Learning Interventions: (1) a two day, immersive, visual arts workshop, (2) facilitations with visual arts academics within the teacher's classroom, and (3) semi-structured discussions to study and curate examples of lived experiences. The triad co-researched the meaning of 'quality' in relation to four dimensions: Learning, Pedagogy, Environment, Community Dynamics (L-PEC). Adapted from Seidel et. al's (2009) Qualities of Quality, L-PEC served as a theoretical lens to guide reflection, inquiry, and action specific to the case teacher's classroom context. By identifying with her pedagogical transformation through examples of visual arts learning made visible, other teachers may gain confidence in their own evolving praxes related to teaching in and through the arts.

Professor Susan Wright is Chair of Arts Education in the Melbourne Graduate School of Education. Her research focuses on learning in and through the arts, socially-constructed arts pedagogy and semiosis within non-verbal domains.

Dr Marnee Watkins is a lecturer in Visual Arts education in the Melbourne Graduate School of Education. Her research focuses on generalist primary teachers' practices and pedagogies related to the arts and teacher artistry through interdisciplinary learning, arts-based collaborations and communities of practice.

Gina Grant is a lecturer in Visual Arts education in the Melbourne Graduate School of Education, currently undertaking doctoral studies looking at the connection between teacher perceptions of space and pedagogical practice.

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Film making as method in art education research

Date: Wednesday 12th Aug 2015
Time: 5.30-7 pm
Venue: Frank Tate Room, Level 9, 100 Leicester Street, The University of Melbourne
RSVP: Gina Grant grantg@unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

In recent times there has been a great deal published about the use of video in social science research. In anthropology there is a long tradition of ethnographic filmmaking as research method. A style of observational documentary making has been a part of television programming since the advent of more portable equipment. Each tradition suggests sets of values, methodologies and methods.

This presentation will reference each tradition to introduce my research project, which is investigating filmmaking as method to explore, describe, analyse and interpret children's experience as they make art in school. I will: confront challenges presented to research by aesthetic and ineffable experience; briefly suggest a radical empiricist methodological foundation; describe specific contexts and practicalities in my research; address issues of reflexivity and ethics.

In practical terms there will be emphasis on how I am adapting filmmaking methods developed by Australian ethnographic filmmaker David MacDougall. I will illustrate his work with examples. I will also demonstrate the potential use of professional digital video editing software, Final Cut Pro X, as a research tool. This will include clips and sequences from my own research. I will also briefly compare this highly intuitive visual data base driven software with other software used for qualitative analysis in education research that has been recently recommended for analysing video in the UK by our ESRC.

The session will conclude with a discussion about what I am learning from this research in progress and where it might lead.

Nigel Meager is currently a full-time doctoral candidate in the Faculty of Education, University of Cambridge, where he has a full scholarship from the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council. Nigel is currently on a three month visit to ANU where he has been invited to work with anthropologist Professor David MacDougall.

Nigel has many years' experience as an artist, teacher and teacher educator in the UK. From 1993 to 2005 he published a number of books which support generalist teachers who teach art in UK primary schools. Nigel is a member of the Expert Subject Advisory Group for art education in England. He is also editor of the Pedagogy Volume of the International Encyclopedia of Art and Design Education to be published by Wiley-Blackwell in 2017. Find out more about Nigel's background and research interests at https://cambridge.academia.edu/nigelmeager

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Music and The Deaf: Enriching Lives Through Music

Date: Tuesday 14th July 2015
Time: 5.30-7 pm
Venue: Theatre Q.227, Level 2, 234 Queensberry Street, Carlton, The University of Melbourne
RSVP: Andria andriak@unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

There is a seemingly apparent paradox of teaching to deaf children. The idea that those with a limited capacity should wish to explore an art or activity based around sound is definitely intriguing. It is not unusual then for people to ask 'How can deaf people play music?' and 'Why do deaf people want to play music?'

Much research has gone into identifying the benefits of learning music, both for individuals as well as the benefits of music for the community. Most research assumes the benefits from a hearing person's perspective, but music is also surprisingly relevant to Deaf/Hard of Hearing children.

Two music educators of the deaf come together to discuss and share the benefits of conspicuously exposing the deaf to music and musical activities.

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Launch of Special Edition UNESCO Observatory for Arts Education E-journal

Indigenous Education in Australia: Challenges, Achievements and Catalysts for Change

Date: Thursday 28th May 2015
Time: 6-7.15 pm
Venue: Theatre Q.230, Level 2, 234 Queensberry Street, Carlton, The University of Melbourne
RSVP: Andria andriak@unimelb.edu.au

This public discussion will present a range of perspectives and insights into the issue of Indigenous education in Australia today.

Colloquium panel members include:
Professor Mick Dodson AM, Director of the National Centre for Indigenous Studies at The Australian National University and Professor of law at the ANU College of Law;

Professor Mark Rose, Director of Indigenous Strategy and Education, La Trobe University;

Dr Helen Drennen, Principal, Wesley College, Melbourne

Professor Ian Anderson, Pro Vice Chancellor (Engagement) University of Melbourne

The Colloquium will be facilitated by Professor Elizabeth McKinley, Melbourne Graduate School of Education

Part 1: Didgeridoo Performance and Welcome from The Dean
Part 2: Speakers Panel
Part 3: Q and A Session

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Critical Play

Date: Monday 28th April 2015
Time: 5.15 pm
Venue: Theatre Q.219, Level 2, 234 Queensberry Street, Carlton, The University of Melbourne
RSVP: Gina Grant grantg@unimelb.edu.au

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The Politics of Art/Art of Politics

Date: Monday 30th March 2015
Time: 5.30 pm
Venue: Frank Tate Room, Level 9, 100 Leicester Street, Carlton, The University of Melbourne
RSVP: Gina Grant grantg@unimelb.edu.au

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Youth Culture from Their Drawings

Date: Wednesday 10th December 2014
Time: 4 pm
Venue: Frank Tate Room, Level 9, 100 Leicester Street, Carlton, The University of Melbourne
RSVP: Jen Stevens-Ballenger jstev@unimelb.edu.au

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Uncrowding the curriculum – the potential of the arts: A forum on the future of teaching and learning in the arts in Australian schools

Date: Thursday 20th Nov 2014
Time: 5.30 pm
Venue: Frank Tate Room, Level 9, 100 Leicester Street, Carlton, The University of Melbourne
RSVP: Jen Stevens-Ballenger jstev@unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

"In any civilised community, the arts and associated amenities must occupy a central place. Their enjoyment should not be seen as remote from everyday life. Of all the objectives of my government, none had a higher priority then the encouragement of the arts - the preservation and enrichment of our cultural and intellectual heritage" (Gough Whitlam).

The recent review of the national Australian Curriculum has recommended reducing arts learning in our schools. Many in the sector see the recommendations as a direct challenge to decades of research and teaching that demonstrates that students who engage in an active, demanding, high-quality arts education are more likely to excel in their academic and non-academic lives. A particular idea highlighted in the review is the notion of the crowded curriculum and the proposition that the arts, particularly with the privileging of all five art forms included in the Australian Curriculum, from Foundation to Year 10, contributes to this already crowded curriculum.

This colloquium aims to present a robust forum on the place of the arts in our schools. A panel of key stakeholders will be invited to present a range of perspectives on the review, and to offer views on the way forward for the arts within the Australian curriculum, and to address the question of how the arts might contribute to the 'uncrowding' of the curriculum.

The panel presentation will be followed by a Q&A style forum.

Panellists and participants in the forum will include researchers and educators, school leaders, classroom and beginning teachers, members of the arts community, with guest contributions from Professor John O'Toole (Lead Writer, Shape Paper for the Arts, Australian Curriculum); Helen Champion and Kathy Hendy-Ekers, Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority.

Forum Chair: Dr Christine Sinclair, Head of Drama Education, Melbourne Graduate School of Education.


International Arts for Peace Festival

Date: Monday 2th June 2014
Time: 5.15 – 7.15pm
Venue: Frank Tate Room, Level 9, 100 Leicester Street, Carlton, The University of Melbourne
Enquiry: Alice Tinning, a.tinning@unimelb.edu.au, Arts Education

Abstract

Arts for Peace, Suzana Zaper

'Songlines of the Yarra' is a short film about a group of 4-5 year old children navigating visible and invisible paths of the Yarra. Their 'singing' of the river generated powerful communication concepts of beauty, past and present, co-existence of the land, river and people and intristic empathy for nature. Interwoven together they form a thread that teaches the ethics of respect in their engagement with the world and unites them in their collective understanding of the ecology of peace The children's intimate symbols and interpretations have been explored through visual language, creative body 'installations', songs and metaphorical narratives.

Arts for Peace, Dave Kelman

This presentation will examine recent art making practice in both university and community contexts: The Autopsy project from the Devising Drama course and The Guernica workshop from the Arts and Artistry primary teacher education course both at the University of Melbourne and 'Fate' a major community music-theatre event with young people and culturally diverse young artists. In particular the presentation will examine the complex relationship between the teaching-artist and the participants and how political material can be appropriately introduced and explored avoiding the pit-falls of didacticism and indoctrination.

Arts for Peace, Dave Kelman

Originally presented at the International Network for Research in Arts Education International "Arts for Peace" Research Symposium, Hong Kong May 2014: Ideas that work around the world: The diverse nature of arts and their relation to education and sustainability.Evolution is an artist-guided visual arts program designed specifically to re-engage at-risk young people challenged by severe health and social issues. It was established in 2010 by a community-based youth arts studio, Signal, in partnership with the Frontyard Youth Support service, and has enabled many young people to re-engage with formal education and training. This presentation reports on the project research outcomes, providing an overview of the program, some of the outcomes, and factors that have contributed to its ongoing success.


The Autopsy

Date: Tuesday 20th May 2014
Time: start at 4pm
Venue: The Open Stage (Corner of Swanston and Grattan St), The University of Melbourne
Enquiry: Alice Tinning, a.tinning@unimelb.edu.au, Arts Education

Abstract

The Autopsy was a piece of experimental, interactive theatre devised by students on the Arts Education Breadth Subject Devising Drama in Communities. The work exploredthe 'Arts for Peace' theme as part of the UNESCO Arts Education week.

Facilitated by Dr. Dave Kelman, the students devised and wrote The Autopsy. The work used Homer's Odyssey as a narrative structure and takes us inside the world of a modern day Odysseus, an investment banker who comes to realise the harm his investments in amoral multi-national corporations are causing to both vulnerable people and the environment. His journey of realization begins at this point and the audience follows him to seedy bars, rough streets and overgrown graveyards as he struggles to find his way home to his long-suffering family.


Jan Deans: Young Children Thinking, Feeling and Relating Through Dance

Date: Wedsday 28th May 2014
Time: 5.30 – 6.45pm
Venue: Frank Tate Room, Level 9, 100 Leicester Street, Carlton, The University of Melbourne
RSVP to Jennifer Stevens-Ballenge: jstev@unimelb.edu.au, Arts Education

Abstract

This qualitative mixed methods case study investigated four and five year old children's learning through dance and the role of the teacher in enabling this learning. Data collected over twenty-six weeks were generated from video recordings, photographs, children's drawings and narratives and teacher program plans. The findings revealed that dance stimulated embodied thinking, expressive communication, empathy for others and a sense of personal and collective agency. Also the effectiveness of a socio-constructivist rights based dance pedagogical platform was uncovered.

Jan Deans

Jan Deans is the Director of the Early Learning Centre, which is the University of Melbourne's research and demonstration preschool. She is also a Senior Lecturer at the Melbourne Graduate School of Education taking the role of Professional Partnership Coordinator for the Master of Teaching (EC) program. She is a long time advocate for teaching and learning through the arts and has worked both locally and internationally in early childhood, primary, tertiary, and special education settings. She has broadly based expertise in relation to early childhood education and service delivery and her recent research interests include learning through dance, social emotional competence and learning through music. In 1997 she established Boorai -The Children's Art Gallery to present the voices of young children as expressed through their art and narratives. Boorai collaborates with educational and community organizations locally, nationally and internationally.


Why Australia Can Lead The World in Music Education

Date: Wedsday 9th April 2014
Time: 5.30 – 6.45pm
Venue: Frank Tate Room, Level 9, 100 Leicester Street, Carlton, The University of Melbourne
RSVP to Jennifer Stevens-Ballenge: jstev@unimelb.edu.au, Arts Education

Abstract

Australia is a world leader in a range of fields as diverse as agriculture, medical research and manufacturing. One reason may be due to our relatively isolated geographical position while it could be argued that this has also led to the development of a culture that often reflects personal artistic expression. In music education there are remarkable examples of ground-breaking teaching methods and performance styles unique to this country. Many of these are the result of a creative approach, a response to the cultural milieu in which the innovator exists. Australia has always been a multi-cultural country but never before has there been such a wide range of cultures in our schools. Thus, teachers have a golden opportunity to embrace students' varied experiences, beliefs and interests and incorporate these into school music programs. Further, when students are encouraged to express themselves in a personal way, both learning and teaching become engaging and fulfilling activities of the highest order.

Ros McMillan is a Senior Fellow in Arts Education, an appointment that followed her retirement in 2005 as Head of Music Education in the University. She has taught 3 - 8 year olds as Australia's first Yamaha teacher, secondary school students as Director of Music at the Presbyterian Ladies' College, Melbourne, and, for 20 years, teacher education students – both primary generalist and secondary music specialists – at the Melbourne College of Advanced Education then the University following its amalgamation with the MCAE in 1994. She has presented workshops and papers in every Australian state and territory as well as Canada, Korea, South Africa, New Zealand, the Netherlands, Norway, Singapore, China, Greece and Hong Kong. With her current appointment in the University as Senior Fellow, Artistic and Creative Education, she supervises PhD and DEd students, her own research interests focussing particularly on creativity in music education. As a performer she specialises in improvisation and for ten years was keyboard player in a trio led by her late husband, Brian Brown, foundation Head of Improvisation Studies at the Victorian College of the Arts.


'Proper' Drama or 'Pure' Mantle?

Date: Wedsday 26th March 2014
Time: 5.30 – 6.45pm
Venue: Frank Tate Room, Level 9, 100 Leicester Street, Carlton, The University of Melbourne
RSVP to Jennifer Stevens-Ballenge: jstev@unimelb.edu.au, Arts Education

Abstract

The Complex Negotiation of Drama for Inquiry Learning - An Arts Education Colloquium with Kim Snider

This presentation examines the negotiation, challenges and benefits of drama for inquiry learning based on research conducted in a British secondary school.

Findings suggest that drama-based inquiry approaches such as Dorothy Heathcote's Mantle of the Expert can support and enrich learning across the curriculum.

At the same time, tensions exist between the rituals that characterize 'pure' Mantle of the Expert and students' desire for active dramatic exploration. Further issues are raised by the structures of curriculum, pedagogy and assessment that limit teachers' flexibility in experimenting with open-ended, arts-based techniques.

It concludes by proposing a 'hybrid' approach to drama for inquiry—one that draws on a range of drama practices and requires skill and responsiveness on the part of the teacher. This presentation will be of interest to classroom teachers, researchers, curriculum developers and those involved in teacher training.


Meaning, Mediation, Metaphor: Embodied Learning through the Arts

Date: Tuesday 12 November 2013
Time: 6 – 7pm
Venue: Theatre Q230, Level 2, 234 Queensberry St

Watch on Youtube

Professor Susan Wright

Professor Susan Wright is Chair of Arts Education at the University of Melbourne. Her teaching and research focuses on young children's meaning-making and communication using artistic symbol systems and multi-modal forms of expression (i.e., visual, spatial, musical and bodily-kinaesthetic ways of knowing) and emphasizes the significance of creative and somatic forms of learning and development. She has been an active researcher, attracting over 30 competitive research grants totalling over $3M. Her most recent books are Understanding Creativity in Early Childhood: Meaning-Making and Children's Drawings (2010, SAGE, UK), Special Education: Perspectives and Practices (2008, Pearson, Singapore), The Arts, Young Children and Learning (2003, Allyn and Bacon, NY) and Children, Meaning-Making and the Arts (1st edition 2003; 2nd edition 2012, Pearson Australia).


Raising the bar: In search of quality in arts and cultural programs for children

Date: Tuesday 9th October 2013
Time: 5.15 – 6.45pm
Venue: Frank Tate Room, Level 9, 100 Leicester Street, Carlton, The University of Melbourne
RSVP: Please RSVP by Tuesday, 8th October, 2013
Contact: Gina Grant / grantg@unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

Children's cultural and artistic participation in Australia is growing annually as more and more children engage in arts and cultural activities in their communities outside of school hours (ABS 4901.0). Increasing numbers of children visit museums, galleries, theatres and libraries to participate in exhibitions, performances and public programs. On a weekly basis, children are routinely involved in all kinds of artistic pursuits in private classes, community centres, clubs and at home; they are playing musical instruments, making art and craft, dancing, singing and performing. The scope of this activity is largely unregulated and without any standards, yet many providers are working to offer high quality experiences for children's artistic and cultural lives. The session will focus on a discussion of the dimensions of quality, and the need to raise the bar to ensure all children's rights to "appropriate and equal opportunities for cultural, artistic, recreational and leisure activity." (United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, Article 31).

Dr Barbara Piscitelli AM

Dr Barbara Piscitelli AM is a freelance consultant and researcher in education and the arts. Her research explores cultural policy and childhood, children's learning in museums, and early childhood visual arts education. In 1986, she established an archive of children's art and has created several exhibitions and catalogues from her collection; she donated the collection to the State Library of Queensland in 2004. Dr Piscitelli was Chair of the Queensland Cultural Policy Advisory Committee, and currently serves on the Council of the National Museum of Australia and as a Board Member of the Queensland Museum. She taught at Queensland University of Technology for 20 years (1984 - 2004) and was Visiting Scholar at the Hong Kong Institute of Education (2007-8). Dr Piscitelli was recognised in the Australia Day 2006 Honours as a Member of the Order of Australia (AM). The citation for her Award reads: 'For service to early childhood education as a teacher, to the establishment of programs in cultural institutions for children, and as a collector and curator of children's art.'


The Artful World of Animals: An art competition and exhibition celebrating 50 years of teaching at the Faculty of Veterinary Science

Explore the world's most spectacular and loved creatures, large and small, exotic and familiar.

Veterinarians, veterinary nurses, University of Melbourne students, alumni and staff, and enthusiast and professional photographers, artists and designers develop critical and creative interpretations on animals using diverse mediums, art styles and techniques. From the curious to the marvellous, this exhibition is a testament to the importance of animals to human culture.

Exhibition Hours

Fri 27 Sep 2013: 10am – 5pm
Sat 28 Sep 2013: 12pm – 4pm
Mon 30 Sep – Fri 4 Oct 2013: 10am – 5pm
Sat 5 Oct 2013: 10am – 5:30pm
Sun 6 Oct 2013: 10am – 4pm

More information


Art Exhibition Opening Night - Sensations of Art-making: Triumphs, Torments and Risk-taking

Date: Friday 4,October 2013
Time: 5:00PM- 8:00PM
Venue: Victorian Artists Society, Frater & McCubbin Galleries. 430 Albert Street, East Melbourne
RSVP: Free attendance. No bookings required.

Abstract

Professional artist-teachers explore the shared sensations that drive their art production and that of their students' - the enthused moments of inspiration, battles, frustrations, joys, risk-taking, experimentation and construction of meaning.

Master of Teaching (Secondary Art) graduates in their early teaching careers imaginatively and critically examine how their creative output increases their ability to mentor, stimulate and understand their students. A testament to the dual profession of artist-teachers, this exhibition features works across diverse mediums that emphasize process as well as the end product. The exhibition forms part of theTeacher as Art-maker Project (TAP) – a significant research initiative and international first for Visual Art Education, providing longitudinal data on teachers' participation in art production, perceptions of quality of teaching, and expectations of retention in the profession.

TAP is administered by Dr. Wesley Imms and Purnima Ruanglertbutr, Melbourne Graduate School of Education. Exhibition dates: 4-15 October 2013.


Collaboration between Glass Artist and ELC Children

Date: Tuesday 24th September 2013
Time: 5.15 – 6.45pm
Venue: Frank Tate Room, Level 9, 100 Leicester Street, Carlton
RSVP: Please RSVP by Tuesday, 8th October, 2013
Contact: Gina Grant / grantg@unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

Suzana Zaper's life- long passion for glass originated in her childhood on the Croatian coast and her constant wonder about its antiquity inspired by found fragments of ancient sea glass and her many visits to the island of Murano. Meeting Philip at his studio for the first time was like watching a poem solidify, his movements baroque in intensity and yet the whole glass making process was like a simple saying of simple things. Philip was being immersed in his art in the same way children are when telling a story, and that was enough to start a unique meeting of imaginations. The children's ideas, complex vocabulary and drawing designs become inspirational points for Philip who skilfully balances each individual vision and weaves them into vivid ideas of his own. The whole process therefore becomes the way in which glass meditates our seeing of the world. Suzana's Curriculum has also been inspired by the collaborative force between the children and the artist whose generous and imaginative personality shaped the children and their identities and vice versa.

Suzana Zaper

Suzana Zaper is an Early Childhood Educator of twenty five years, currently teaching at the University of Melbourne's Early Learning Centre. She graduated in Early Childhood and completed her Master of Education by research on 'Poetical Understanding of Children's Imagery of Nature.' Her passion for poetry and children's metaphorical expressions through arts has taken her on many collaborative journeys with artists from fields of literature, film and glass. Suzana has published a number of articles that reflect her interest in the ways in which children's poetical language 'sings' the world. She has presented at numerous conferences, co-produced children's books, educational resources and films and curated children's exhibitions in Australia and internationally


Maintaining 'a practice': Visual Art research into teachers as practitioners

Date: Tuesday 10th September 2013
Time: 5.15 – 6.45pm
Venue: Frank Tate Room, Level 9, 100 Leicester Street, Carlton
RSVP: by Monday, 9th September 2013
Contact: Gina Grant / grantg@unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

It is sometimes said that to be a good teacher we must also 'do'; we must keep our passion for our subject alive through active practise. But can newly graduated teachers maintain personal activity in their subject discipline of choice once they enter the classroom? If they do, how does this impact their teaching and career pathways? By not providing strategies during their training period on how to maintain active out-of-school practise, are we underpreparing our teacher candidates?

Ongoing results from an Australian longitudinal study provide some insight into these important questions. The Teacher as Art-maker Project (TAP) is tracking early career art educators' teaching and art-making experiences. Analysis provides valuable insight into new teachers' rate of artistic practice, perceptions of the quality of their teaching, and expectations of retention in teaching. These data help us address many complex issues that not only stop practicing artists from teaching, but also opens conceptualise the wider issue of teachers as practitioners.

Teachers as Art Project (TAP) Media Release 2013

Art Making Invitation

Wesley Imms

Wesley Imms is Senior Lecturer and Head of Visual Art Education at the University of Melbourne, Australia. While primarily a curriculum theorist, his multi-disciplinary research conflates issues concerning gender, teacher education, the utilization of new generation learning spaces, trans-disciplinary pedagogy, architecture, applied design, and teacher/artist issues.


Curious Teachers, Curious Schools: Making Creativity Visible in Tasmanian Schools

Date: Wednesday, 21st August, 2013
Time: 5:15PM- 6:45PM
Venue: Frank Tate Room, Level 9, 100 Leicester Street, Carlton
RSVP: Free attendance. No bookings required.

Abstract

Professional artist-teachers explore the shared sensations that drive their art production and that of their students' - the enthused moments of inspiration, battles, frustrations, joys, risk-taking, experimentation and construction of meaning.

Master of Teaching (Secondary Art) graduates in their early teaching careers imaginatively and critically examine how their creative output increases their ability to mentor, stimulate and understand their students. A testament to the dual profession of artist-teachers, this exhibition features works across diverse mediums that emphasize process as well as the end product. The exhibition forms part of the Teacher as Art-maker Project (TAP) - a significant research initiative and international first for Visual Art Education, providing longitudinal data on teachers' participation in art production, perceptions of quality of teaching, and expectations of retention in the profession.

TAP is administered by Dr. Wesley Imms and Purnima Ruanglertbutr, Melbourne Graduate School of Education. Exhibition dates: 4-15 October 2013.


Artworks in Residence: Young children's responses to visual art

Date: Tuesday 14 May, 2013
Time: 5:15PM- 6:45PM
Venue: Frank Tate Room, Level 9, 100 Leicester Street, Carlton
RSVP: Please RSVP by Friday, 10th May, 2013
Contact: Gina Grant / grantg@unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

Professional artist-teachers explore the shared sensations that drive their art production and that of their students' - the enthused moments of inspiration, battles, frustrations, joys, risk-taking, experimentation and construction of meaning.

Master of Teaching (Secondary Art) graduates in their early teaching careers imaginatively and critically examine how their creative output increases their ability to mentor, stimulate and understand their students. A testament to the dual profession of artist-teachers, this exhibition features works across diverse mediums that emphasize process as well as the end product. The exhibition forms part of the Teacher as Art-maker Project (TAP) - a significant research initiative and international first for Visual Art Education, providing longitudinal data on teachers' participation in art production, perceptions of quality of teaching, and expectations of retention in the profession.

TAP is administered by Dr. Wesley Imms and Purnima Ruanglertbutr, Melbourne Graduate School of Education. Exhibition dates: 4-15 October 2013.


Colloquium Composer Speaks: The Music of Liza Lim

Date: Wednesday 8th August
Time: 5.30 – 6.30pm
Venue: Frank Tate Room, Level 9, 100 Leicester Street, The University of Melbourne

Liza Lim presents two free workshops relating to a NEW teacher resource kit.
The Music of Liza Lim. Resource prepared by Kim Waldock.

What is happening:
Liza Lim returns to Australia and will hold two workshops relating to the works in the new teacher resource kit The Music of Liza Lim.

Liza will talk through some of the exercises in the resource kit and how teachers might go about using them. She will also give a brief intro to each work followed by a question and answer time. The works covered include Songs found in dream; The Compass; Invisibility; and Pearl, Ochre, Hair String.

Written during a period when Lim was becoming increasingly exposed to and engaged with Indigenous cultures, these works all exhibit strong influences from Indigenous and Aboriginal music making. The workshop will cover some of the compositional devices Lim uses to reflect these influences, such as:

  • Indigenous Australian Songlines
  • The aesthetic of Shimmer
  • The integration of traditional instruments
  • Compositional techniques used to evoke Indigenous influences without using traditional instruments

The workshop will be tailored specifically to the final audience, with content suitable for:

  • Tertiary academics and students
  • Senior secondary teachers and students

Hosted by the Melbourne Graduate School of Education, the event is supported by the Australian Music Centre and Huddersfield University (UK).

Bookings:
The workshops are free of charge and places are strictly limited. To reserve your place phone the Australian Music Centre on (02) 9247 4677, Toll Free (outside of Sydney) on 1300 651 834 or email Philippa Horn: p.horn@australianmusiccentre.com.au.
RSVP by Fri 3 August 2012


Colloquium & Book Launch

Fulbright Senior Specialis
Creativity, the Arts and Contemporary Education

Date: Tuesday, 7th August, 2012
Time: 5.15 – 7.00pm
Venue: Frank Tate Room, Level 9, 100 Leicester Street, The University of Melbourne
Contact: Jennifer Stevens-Ballenger: jstev@unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

Historically, the Arts have been perceived as a desirable add-on to teaching and learning, but not seen as central to curriculum or schooling or the development of student creativity. In an information age dependent on innovation and a constantly changing body of knowledge, this will not do. Arnold Aprill, the founder of the Chicago Arts Partnerships in Education (CAPE) will give a lecture / demonstration on what happens when the Arts assume their rightful place at the centre of 21st century education. This presentation will include examples of effective practice and descriptions of educational policies that make these successful strategies possible. Arnold will draw connections between effective innovation in arts and learning in Chicago and provocative frameworks presented in the new edition of Education in the Arts.

Arnold Aprill is the Founder and Lead Consultant of the Chicago Arts Partnerships in Education (CAPE), a network of artists and arts organizations, educators and schools that are dedicated to school improvement through long-term arts education partnerships. He is one of the authors of Renaissance in the Classroom: Arts Integration and Meaningful Learning, and consults nationally and internationally on the role of the arts in effective school improvement. He is working in Australia as a Fulbright Senior Specialist with the University of Tasmania, University of Melbourne and University of Sydney.


Dave Kelman and The Flemington Theatre Group

The Flemington Manifesto...

Date: Tuesday 8th May, 2012
Time: 5.15 – 7.00pm
Venue: Open Stage Theatre, University of Melbourne, 757 Swanston Street (Cnr. Grattan & Swanston)
RSVP: By Friday 4th May to Jennifer Stevens-Ballenger: jstev@unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

The Flemington Theatre Group are an innovative ensemble based in the Flemington Commission Flats. The group are from Horn of Africa cultural backgrounds and recently followed up their ground-breaking work Black Face White Mask with Zamunda, a riotous comedy that explored African identity through folk story and played to a huge community audience in Flemington.

In this Forum the FTG will present the Manifesto of their evolving practice:

  • Their aesthetics
  • Their theories of community engagement and leadership
  • Their analysis of the value and complexity of meaningful community arts practice
  • Their aspirations as emerging artists who transcend the victim narratives and create popular theatre with a strong Afro-Australian accent.

This event is a Research Partnership between Western Edge Youth Arts and the University of Melbourne and is for community artists, community workers and researchers who want to hear an authentic, unmediated community voice and enter into new artistic dialogues.

The Flemington Theatre Group are a group of emerging theatre artists from Horn of Africa backgrounds based in Flemington. The group was formed and developed by Dave Kelman and David cuong Nguyen of Western Edge Youth Arts. The group's work includes the widely acclaimed 'Black Face White Mask', a play exploring Afro-Australian identity that was featured on the ABC's Art Nation, and 'Zamunda', a community play that recently played to huge community audiences.

Dave Kelman is the Artistic Director of the Education Program of Western Edge Youth Arts in western Melbourne. He is a director, playwright and drama educator who completed his doctorate on socio-cultural meaning in young people's dramatised stories at the University of Melbourne in 2009.

Enquiries:
Dr Richard Sallis / 83448799 / sallis@unimelb.edu.au
Ms Jennifer Stevens-Ballenger / 90353268 / jstev@unimelb.edu.au


Dr Susan O'Neill

Creating Expansive Learning Opportunities in Intergenerational Arts Program

Date: Tuesday, 17th April, 2012
Time: 5.15 – 6.45 pm
Venue: Frank Tate Room, Level 9, 100 Leicester Street, Carlton

Abstract

Schools as institutions have been slow to encourage collaboration across generations that cultivate expansive learning opportunities or "real world" learning about issues that matter in the local community. Expansive learning is a key component of multidimensional transformative pedagogies and emergent or "lived" curricula approaches that foster learning through relationship building, student-centred activity, and creative collaborations. Traditional learning theories often fail to take into account the fluid and changing nature of knowledge as it is situated in cultural ecologies with temporal, spatial, and relational dimensions. In fostering artistic and cultural competencies, knowledge is learned as it is being created. This shifts the focus from acquisition-based, individual artistic expressions and community involvement to transformative approaches that encourage positive development and expansive learning that is situated within relationships between generations. These approaches emphasize cyclical rather than linear approaches to arts education through creative collaborations, inquiry, dialogue and reflection. These skills build on the foundation of traditional school curriculum and provide expansive opportunities for learning, relationship building, meaning making, and communication. They also foster cultural competencies for understanding changes in local and global landscapes. In exploring these ideas, I will present findings from a recent intergenerational arts program that I developed in Vancouver, Canada. The program is situated within a community partnership and knowledge mobilization framework involving children (Grades 5-6), teachers, parents, elders, historians, museum curators, and researchers. The project is called Artistic Explorations of the World of Work on the Waterfront: Past, Present and Future. The study explores the constituents of intergenerational artistic inquiry curricula and ways to foster creative collaborations across generations so as to cultivate expansive learning opportunities and relationship building. I will also discuss how we negotiated the considerable challenges of intergenerational programming and our approach to research involving collaborative pedagogical narration.

Dr Susan O'Neill is Associate Professor in Arts Education, Director of Research for Youth, Music and Education (RYME) and Director of the Arts Matter Learning Projects. Her interdisciplinary background includes graduate studies in three disciplines: MA in Music Performance Studies, MA in Education, PhD in Psychology. She is recipient of fellowships from the University of Michigan, USA (2001-2003) and the Miegunyah Distinguished Visiting Fellowship at the University of Melbourne, Australia (2012). Her international collaborative research projects focus on artistic learning and transformative arts and music engagement through explorations of expansive learning opportunities and creative collaborations in and through multimodal and integrated arts, digital media, intergenerational relationships, critical arts education, learning partnerships, youth voice and arts for social change.

Enquiries:
Dr Richard Sallis / 83448799 / sallis@unimelb.edu.au
Ms Jennifer Stevens-Ballenger / 83448368 / jstev@unimelb.edu.au


Wesley Imms (MGSE) and Benjamin Cleveland (ABP)

What Impact Does the Physical Environment Have on Teaching and Learning? The Role of the Learning Environments Applied Research Network (LEaRN)

Date: Monday, 28th November, 2011
Time: 5.15 – 6.45 pm
Venue: Frank Tate Room, Level 9, 100 Leicester Street, Carlton

Abstract

In 2008 MGSE partnered the Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning (ABP) to establish LEaRN. Since then this organization has formed strategic partnerships with institutions across Australia and overseas, has brought together experts in architecture, education, health, design and industry to discuss and further knowledge about the impact of space on learning, has written and implemented post-graduate study on this topic, and has supported a range of applied research into this developing discourse, including two successful ARC Linkage grants.

This presentation will address the possibilities LEaRN holds for research and teaching practice in MGSE. It will overview its structure and operation, describe some of the research that has already been undertaken under its umbrella, and will seek to engage members of our school in discussion about potential overlaps in current and planned developments in MGSE teaching and research.

Ben Cleveland is Research Fellow (LEaRN) in the Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning (ABP) and lectures in the Innovative Spaces and Pedagogy Masters subject co-coordinated by MGSE and ABP. He recently completed his PhD, entitled 'Engaging spaces: Innovative learning environments, pedagogies and student engagement in the middle years of school', as a member of the Smart Greens Schools ARC Linkage project. Ben has a particular interest in supporting processes of educational innovation and believes that viewing education as a spatial enterprise, rather than one mediated simply by curriculum, pedagogy and assessment, is critical to developing education models that are suited to contemporary society. The focus of his current research is on developing tools for the evaluation of learning environments in schools and higher education. Ben is a former primary and secondary school science teacher.

Wesley Imms is Senior Lecturer and Head of Visual Art Education at the University of Melbourne. While primarily a curriculum theorist, his multi-disciplinary research conflates issues concerning gender, teacher education, the utilization of new generation learning spaces, trans-disciplinary pedagogy, architecture, applied design, and teacher/artist issues.

Enquiries:
Dr Richard Sallis / 83448799 / sallis@unimelb.edu.au
Ms Jennifer Stevens-Ballenger / 83448368 / jstev@unimelb.edu.au


Dr Matthew Reason

Experiencing Art

Date: Monday, 7th November, 2011
Time: 5.15 – 6.45 pm
Venue: Frank Tate Room, Level 9, 100 Leicester Street, Carlton

Abstract

Embracing variously phenomenology, audience research, flux events and participatory enquiry this talk explores what is meant by the experience of art. It considers the immediate, sensorial experience; the longer experience that resonates in our lasting imagination; the anticipatory experience; the latent and manifest experiences; the engaged experience and the dissatisfied non-experience.

The talk draws on research that I have conducted with both adult and young audiences to dance and theatre performances utilising a range of methodologies – including drawing, creative writing, participatory enquiry, diaries, focus groups and interviews – and reflects on how this has informed and problematized my understanding of what I was trying to research in the first place.

Matthew Reason is a Senior Lecturer in Theatre and Head of Programme for MA Studies in Creative Practice at York St John University. His research explores themes relating to audiences and the experience of art and theatre, theatre for young audiences, cultural policy, liveness, performance documentation and reflective practice in theatre pedagogy. Publications include Documentation, Disappearance and the Representation of Live Performance (Palgrave 2006) and The Young Audience: Exploring and Enhancing Children's Experiences of Theatre (Trentham 2010). He has recently completed working on a major three year AHRC funded project titled 'Watching Dance: Kinesthetic Empathy'. This project explored dance audiences through the use of neuroscience and qualitative audience research and is a collaboration between the universities of Manchester, York St John, Glasgow and Imperial College London. An edited volume (with Dee Reynolds) on Kinesthetic Empathy in Creative and Cultural Practices will be published by Intellect in December 2011.


Dr Carol Carter, Dr Richard Sallis, Dr Marnee Watkins

Navigating the Doctoral Road and Reaching Your Destination – A Panel Discussion


Date: Monday, 31th October, 2011
Time: 5.15 – 6.45 pm
Venue: Frank Tate Room, Level 9, 100 Leicester Street, Carlton

Abstract

The panel members are all Arts educators who have completed their doctoral studies in the Melbourne Graduate School of Education in the past three years. They will discuss how they 'navigated' their way towards attaining their Doctorate, highlighting particular challenges, successes, pitfalls and epiphanies.

The main focus of the colloquium will be the processes Carol, Richard and Marnee undertook to conduct their research and complete their theses - from 'getting started' through to reaching 'the finishing line'.

Along the way they will discuss topics such as ethical conduct, overcoming hurdles in the field, drafting, writing up the thesis and staying motivated and on course. The session will be informative, punctuated by the occasional pertinent anecdote. It will no doubt be of interest to current or prospective RHD students.

Dr Carol Carter is currently a sessional lecturer in teacher education at the University of Melbourne and the Melbourne Institute of Technology (MIT). Her teaching focus includes drama education, language and literacies and various aspects of Education Theory. She was involved in education for a number of years in South Africa - as a primary school teacher, educational director of a company engaged with community education through theatre/drama and as a full-time university lecturer and BEd coordinator. Her Masters research examined and addressed potential constraints in the use of Drama in Education in South African Classrooms In her PhD she investigated the potential role of oral art forms in supporting drama pedagogy and intercultural understanding within pre-service teacher education.

Dr Richard Sallis is a lecturer in drama/theatre education in the Melbourne Graduate School of Education at the University of Melbourne. He began his career writing, directing and acting in theatre for young people and is a past contributing editor for Lowdown, youth performing arts magazine. Richard is the Director of International Liaison, for Drama Australia, the drama educators' association of Australia; he is a past president of the association. He is a trustee of the Australian Children's Theatre Foundation, a board member of the Arena Theatre Company and an author of the Acting Smart drama textbook series. His recent PhD looked at gender identity, ethnographic performance and drama education.

Dr Marnee Watkins is a lecturer in visual arts education in the Graduate School of Education at the University of Melbourne, teaching in undergraduate and postgraduate programs. She completed her Doctorate of Education in 2009 investigating 'art rich' picture books and their affordances for thinking and inquiry in the primary classroom. Her current research and practice reflects her ongoing professional interest in graduate primary teachers' needs for post-tertiary support, specifically related to implementing the arts in their interdisciplinary generalist teaching. Marnee's professional experience extends over thirty years working in Victoria and the Northern Territory as a teacher, lecturer and project officer on curriculum development.

Enquiries:
Dr Richard Sallis / 83448799 / sallis@unimelb.edu.au
Ms Jennifer Stevens-Ballenger / 83448368 / jstev@unimelb.edu.au


Professor Susan Wright

Researching Children's Voice: Meaning-Making through Graphic-Narrative Play

Date: Monday, 24th October, 2011
Time: 5.15 – 6.45 pm
Venue: Frank Tate Room, Level 9, 100 Leicester Street, Carlton

Abstract

Drawing is a significant mediating tool for surfacing the voices of children. When viewed from a semiotic perspective, children's drawings – as macro events or holistic messages – include an expansive range of signs used in highly interactive, fluid and expressive ways. Through drawing, children make images of their own contemplation, to shape and reshape, revise and revision their lives. Drawing provides a vehicle by which children can express their growing awareness of themselves and the worlds in which they live, connecting deep levels of symbol, meaning and emotion. This involves the depiction of content through graphic and body-based action, while talking about aspects of the artwork and/or the processes of its creation through a free-form type of narrative. Children's dialoguing with the materials of art is a highly creative and 'fluid' process where they mentally manipulate and organize thoughts and feelings.

This paper focuses on how the following interact relationally as young children compose through Graphic-Narrative Play, in 'real time':

  • The content (i.e., themes, people, places, objects, events), and
  • The form in which this content is communicated through three modes:
    • Graphic (i.e., structural arrangements and use of art elements, symbols, icons and iconic devices),
    • Narrative (i.e., telling the content and the processes of its creation through various forms – literal, fictional or metaphoric), and
    • Embodied (i.e., descriptive action, gesture, expressiveness or dramatization).

Examples of several children's drawings and narratives will be presented to illustrate the research themes that emerged from the analysis of over one hundred 5-to-8 year old children. Implications for teaching and further research focuses on the importance of the arts in education in general, and for young children in particular.

Professor Susan Wright is Chair of Arts Education at the University of Melbourne. Previously, she was Head of Early Childhood and Special Needs Education at the National Institute of Education in Singapore (2006-2009) and Director of the Centre for Applied Studies in Early Childhood at the Queensland University of Technology (1999-2003). Her teaching and research focuses on young children's meaning-making and communication using artistic symbol systems and multi-modal forms of expression (i.e., visual, spatial, musical and bodily-kinaesthetic ways of knowing) and emphasizes the significance of creative and somatic forms of learning and development. She has been an active researcher, attracting over 30 competitive research grants 20 of which have focused on the arts. Her most recent books are Children, Meaning-Making and the Arts (2nd edition 2012, Pearson Australia), Understanding Creativity in Early Childhood: Meaning-Making and Children's Drawings (2010, SAGE, UK), Special Education: Perspectives and Practices (2008, Pearson, Singapore), The Arts, Young Children and Learning (2003, Allyn and Bacon, NY).